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Healthy Home Made Archie Squares

Sharing only the best recipes with your best friends. 🙂

  • 2 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup powdered dry milk
  • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1 tsp. brown sugar or honey
  • 6 tbs. meat or bacon drippings, cold right from refrigerator, not melted or soft!
  • 1 egg, slightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup Ice water
  • Directions:

    Preheat oven to 350 ° F (180 ° C).

    Archie Squares - Rottyranch.comLightly oil a cookie sheet.

    Combine flour, dry milk, garlic powder and sugar.

    Cut in meat drippings until mixture resembles corn meal.

    Mix in egg. Add enough water so that mixture forms a ball.

    Using your fingers, pat out dough onto cookie sheet to 1/2″ thick. Cut dough into squares appropriate for your dog size. Prick each cookie with fork.

    Bake 25-30 minutes.

    Remove from tray and cool on rack.

    Store in airtight container.

    Healthy Home Made Apple Cinnamon Drops

    Makes about 3 dozen crunchy cookies, depending on how big you make them.

  • 1 large apple
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/2 cup of water
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1 cup oatmeal
  • 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1/8 cup whole wheat flour
  • Directions:

    Preheat oven to 350 ° F (180 ° C).

    Apple Cinnamon DropsCore, slice and mince the apple (use a food processor if you have one). In a large bowl, combine the minced apple bits, honey, water, cinnamon, and oatmeal. Gradually blend in the wheat flour, adding enough to form a stiff dough.

    In a small bowl, add 1/8 cup wheat flour. Spoon the dough by rounded teaspoon onto ungreased baking sheets, spacing about 2 inches (5cm) apart. Using the bottom of a glass dipped in the wheat flour (to prevent sticking), flatten each spoonful of dough into a circle. Adjust the size of the drops based on how big a treat you like to feed your dog.

    Bake for 30 minutes. Remove from oven and flip each cookie to brown evenly on both sides. Reduce oven temperature to 325 ° F (180 °C). Return to oven and bake for an additional 30 minutes. Let cool overnight.

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    Welcome to the Advice – Dogs Daily Grooming Routine

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    Grooming is an important part of daily care for your dog.
    Daily dog grooming can help if they are always scratching, gets ear infections easily, or always seems to have runny eyes.

    Grooming isn’t just about brushing or trimming your dog’s hair. It’s about
    caring for their skin to avoid allergies and hot spots keeping his nails

    at the proper length to avoid paw problems.
    keeping his ears clean to prevent infection, and
    inspecting and cleaning the "goop" around his eyes, to prevent infection and injury.

    Another benefit of daily dog grooming is the attention your dog receives.

    As a pack animal, he needs interactions and attention. Brushing and checking him require some serious one-on-one time, just the thing he’s looking for.

    Even if it’s just 15 minutes a day, that time can help prevent behavioral problems.

    See Spend Time With Your Dog for more on the importance of "investing" attention to your dog.

    If you’re short on time, combine your daily dog grooming with the daily examination of your dog you do to check for developing health issues.

    If your dog is older, they will benefit from your grooming in another way. Older dogs often have sore or aching joints and muscles. While you’re brushing, give a light massage to his neck, back and legs. Their circulation will improve, and the warmth of the massage will soothe his pains. Your Dogs Coat

    There are many allergic reaction and infections that can occur on your dog’s skin, hidden under their fur.

    Regular grooming can help reduce the risk of these, and improve his skin and hair condition in the process.

    Your Dogs Nails

    The nails are susceptible to problems as well, including infections and snags. Keep the nails trimmed and inspect them regularly.

    Your Dogs Ears

    Ear infections are common in dogs, especially ones with long, floppy ears. Regular inspection, and cleaning when they need it, will help keep your dog free from infection.

    Your Dogs Eyes

    Tear stains on your dog’s white or light-colored coat may indicate eye problems. A regular inspection will let you know if there are problems. Wipes will help you keep the tear-eyed look away.

    Dog grooming can help your dog avoid infections and other problems. Give him 15 – 30 minutes of your time every day to help them stay well.

    THE Advice of Rotty Ranch Crew & Friends

    Welcome to the Advice – Dog Proofing Your Home –

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    Did you dog proof your home before you got your dog?

    If not, they are at risk — every day — of poisoning, electrocution or injury. Thousands of dogs die each year from avoidable accidents in the home. Will your latest family member be one of them???

    Puppies, with their curiosity and need to chew, are particularly vulnerable.

    A dog loose in an unfenced yard is an accident waiting to happen. You can easily avoid all these incidents.

    Read these pages to help and learn how to protect your newest friend, then invest some time to dog proof your home and garden.

    You’ll reduce the chance of ever needing to use dog first aid. Remove or Secure Poisons. Poisoning is a very common, and very preventable, cause of harm to dogs.
    Dog proof your home by simply the removing or securing all poisonous products, including toxic cleaners and batteries. Remove Toxic Houseplants. Houseplants add beauty to a home, and many help clean the air. Some, however, are toxic to dogs and other pets.

    Dog proof your home by removing these toxic houseplants or placing them out of your dog’s (and children’s) reach.

    free Delivery on orders over £59

    Don’t Give Your Dog Toxic Foods There are foods that we all enjoy and perhaps even love but they are toxic to your dog. You can avoid canine health problems by refusing to give him "human" foods and providing a safe alternative.

    Reduce Electrocution and Other Hazards

    Every year, many dogs are electrocuted in the home. Others asphyxiate when they get tangled up in plastic bags, or choke on small items they swallow. Some tear their skin on a loose staple under a sofa or chair, or on a nail sticking out from the wall. Many more fall down stairs and seriously injure themselves. Secure your electric cords and remove or eliminate household hazards to help keep your dog safe inside your home.

    Avoid Using Toxic Garden Plants

    There are many plants for your garden that are dangerous for your dog. Some can result in death. Dog proof your garden by using some of the dozens of garden plants that aren’t toxic for your dog.

    Eliminate Outdoor Poisons

    Many dogs become ill due to the biocides used on lawns and gardens. Some plants are toxic to dogs. There are many safe ways to control unwanted plants, insects and diseases in your lawn and garden, and many safe plants that will add beauty.

    Rid your property of the dangerous ones and make your dog’s life safer.

    Add Fencing or a Restraint System

    A dog on the loose is a dog at risk of running onto the road, eating tainted garbage, or getting into a neighbor’s garden.

    Your dog will likely be injured or become ill sooner rather than later if they are allowed the run of the district/neighborhood.
    If you need to leave your dog outside, confine him to your own garden with a fence, stake and chain, or other restraint system.

    There are many different types of dog containment systems on the market these days. It’s important to find the system that works best for you and your dog.

    If you follow these simple steps to dog-proof your home, you’ll keep your canine companion safe, secure and healthy.

    That’s definitely worth the small investment in time and energy, isn’t it?


    Welcome to the Advice – Dogs And House Hold Hazzards –

    THE Advice of Rotty Ranch Crew & Friends

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    Anything you consider household hazards for an infant or small child are also dangerous for your dog.

    Electrical cords, plastic bags, small items on the floor, steep stairs and sharp objects protruding from walls can harm your dog.
    What’s the best way to find household hazards that can take your dog’s life?

    Do a "dog’s eye view" inspection of your home. Look at things the way they do. View the world from their perspective. In basic at knee height.
    Get down on your knees and look under the beds, sofas and chairs. Open floor-level cupboards and check what’s in them.

    Check how steep the stairs are for an animal with much shorter legs than yours.

    Dogs, especially puppies, love to chew. As omnivores, they’ll eat just about anything. They can also be single-minded when it comes to getting a favorite toy from some tight space. Naturally they are inquisitive as well. An intriguing scent will have them trying to open a cupboard door to find the source, or tearing open a gift of chocolate from within its box.

    Knowing these characteristics can help you see household hazards that you might normally overlook.

    Check the list below of household products/hazards and see what you might be able to do to reduce or eliminate their danger to your dog.

    Avoiding Emergencies

    As important as it is to know what to do during a emergency , and how to do it, it’s possibly far more important to avoid the situations that put dogs at risk. Prevention is always and always will be far better than cure.

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    Electrical Cords Will Electrocute

    Electrical cords present a life-threatening danger to your dog. Especially if they likes to chew, and especially if they likes to chew anything that resembles an electrical cord (like their lead, or a rope), they are at risk of electrocution.

    There are four ways to deal with these household hazards. They are best used in combination.

    First, keep cords out of her reach. Do not run them along the floor. Suspend them at least six inches from the floor. Your dog is much less likely to stand and chew a cord than she is to lie down and enjoy a “teething session” with it.

    Second, use a bitter-tasting spray on all electrical cords that she can, or might be able to, reach. These products are nontoxic, yet make anything they are sprayed on unpalatable to animals.

    I also recommend these sprays for toxic houseplants and anything else you want to keep her from chewing.
    Third, unplug cords when the appliances or tools are not in use. This is the least effective of the three in terms of keeping your dog safe all the time. She may become used to chewing on a cord while it is unplugged, then one day chew on it when it’s plugged in.


    Fourth, give her a few things to chew on. She’ll enjoy a squeaky toy, a tennis ball, and a cornstarch bone. Praise her when she chews on these items and she’ll soon prefer them to cords and other dangerous household hazards items.

    Outdoor electrical cords are greater household hazards because typically they are left lying on the ground where your dog can easily reach them and chew on them.

    Once again reduce the danger by keeping them off the ground whenever possible, spraying them with a bitter spray, unplugging them when not in use, and keeping your dog in a fenced run or tied up when you use electrical tools and appliances outside.

    If you have the time for a more effective “cure,” you can train your dog not to chew, or even approach, electrical cords.

    This is an attention-intensive process, as you’ll have to observe them whenever they are awake. Be alert to “quiet” times. They may simply be asleep, but they may also have found something new to enjoy.

    Combine some or all of these techniques to ensure that they never succumbs to these indoor and outdoor household hazards.

    Plastic Bags Can Cause Asphyxiation

    Have you ever tried to separate two layers of clingy plastic, like the type your dry cleaning comes in?

    They seem to stick like they’re glued together. That is the danger of these plastics when it comes to small children and your dog. Plastic bags left where they can reach them pose a household hazards grave risk of asphyxiation to your dog. You might not think they would be interested in a lump of plastic. That may be so, but what if their favorite ball rolls inside the bag. They might go right in there after it. Once in there, and the plastic settles over their snout, they may begin to panic and struggle, which will make it worse for them.

    There’s a very easy way to avoid these household hazards. Immediately after use, put all plastic bags in a secure place if you want to keep them, or in the rubbish if they are no longer needed. And keep the rubbish bin lid securely fastened to the bin.

    Ask a Vet Online Now.  Get an Answer ASAP

    Small Objects Can Choke Your Dog

    Your dog learns about many things with their mouth, or, more accurately, by putting things in their mouth. They learn about the size, shape, texture, taste, and whether they can be chewed or not. They do not learn whether they should be swallowed or not. More often than not, once the item is in their mouth, it will be swallowed.

    Just about any small object is fair game for your pet. Buttons, coins, small stones, game pieces, bugs — if will fit in their mouth, it will likely end up in their mouth. The danger lies in the swallowing.

    If the object is small enough, they will swallow it without choking or obstructing their airway (of course, then they might run the risk of a GI tract obstruction).

    A little bit bigger, and the object may become stuck. If it’s not too big, they may be able to gag or retch it back up. Some objects, however, can lodged in the windpipe and cut off air to the lungs.

    All of these can be prevented by simply keeping small objects off the floor and off low tables. Regularly check under beds, sofas and chairs for buttons, coins and similar small items. Have your children put away all toys and games when they’re done, (same with many adult items as well).

    Keep dirty laundry off the floor; your dog may decide to chew on a few buttons. Keep shoes with laces off the floor or in a closet; if they swallow the laces, they could cause problems in their digestive system.

    Outside

    Train them not to chew stones. Also train them not to pick up items they find in the garden or during your walks. You’ll have to be very alert to this hazard. There were times that my dog had something in their mouth so quickly that I wasn’t even sure if they had picked it up.
    Of course, it was always difficult to get these objects out of their mouth because they didn’t want to let them go and may perhaps mistake this for playing.

    Invest a few hours of your time to check for and eliminate these household hazards. That small investment will reduce the chance that you’ll ever need to use dog first aid.

    Welcome to the Advice – Daily Check Routine –

    The Advice of Rotty Ranch Crew & Friends
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    Even if our dogs are generally healthy, we as their protectors still want to know if somethings wrong.

    A daily examination of your dog will let you know if anything is wrong, before it becomes serious. By examining them on a daily basis, you’re educating your fingers about what’s normal for them, so that you’ll know when there’s something that might be out of the normal.

    An added bonus of a daily examination of your dog is the attention you give them. Since your dog is looking for your love and attention, this is one more opportunity to give them what they craves.

    See Spend Time With Your Dog for more on the benefits of giving him attention.

    Performing the Exam
    This daily examination of your dog requires no special skills. Your hands and fingers do all the work, with some help from your eyes and your brain. Follow these simple steps. Be sure to speak your dog’s name while doing these steps.

    Run your hands down their head and ears, then down the front of their body.
    Run your hands along their back and the sides of his body.
    Run them down the outsides of their hind legs.
    Do a quick check of their chest and abdomen.

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    What are you looking for?

    What will a daily exam reveal?

    Cuts, scratches and other small wounds

    Skin problems, such as rashes, hot spots, and unusual hair loss
    Aches and pains, either minor or more serious (see below)
    Eye and ear infections
    Tooth and gum problems

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    Three Indicators
    There are three indicators that will tell you how serious the problem is.

    Is it a sudden change?
    Is it something that wasn’t there yesterday, or is much worse today than it has been?
    If so, you may need to get him to the vet.

    Is the pain local or general?
    A localized pain over a small area may indicate a cut or scratch or other less serious problem. If, during the daily examination of your dog, they appears to be in pain everywhere, or over a large area, take them straight to the vet.

    Has the problem been around for a long time?
    If this is a chronic condition, it is less of a crisis, and may not require that you take them to the vet.
    Judge these indicators with common sense.

    If what you detect or observe during daily examination of your dog is something you wouldn’t go to the doctor for if you found it on yourself or your child, then you probably don’t need to take your dog to the vet.
    However, if you’re not certain if it’s serious, or need some reassurance, make the trip to be on the safe side and put your mind at ease.

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    Ask a Vet Online Now. Get an Answer ASAP
    Nine Warning Signs
    There are “nine” basic warning signs to be aware of during your daily care routine.

    Although not necessarily a part of the daily examination of your dog, any of these can mean a trip to the vet.

    Difficulty breathing. Dogs pant and breathe hard when they’re active, or hot. However, if yours has been laying down and quiet, but is still panting or gasping, you should be concerned. This could be a sign of a lung or heart problem. At the very least, their body is being deprived of sufficient oxygen, which can cause organ damage.

    Check for pink gums. Pale or blue gums can be a sign of blood loss, perhaps from internal bleeding. Dark red or inflamed gums are less serious, but still indicate a problem. His gums may be infected, or irritated by tartar. See Dog Dental Care for more on this.

    Serious digestive problems are indicated by vomiting two to three times in an hour, or six times or more in eight hours. If this happens, get him to the vet right away. See Signs of Vomiting and Causes of Vomiting for more information.

    A chemical-like smell on his breath tends to mean that he’s been into something toxic. Rush him to the vet or emergency animal clinic for poisoning treatment.
    (See Household Poisons for tips on how to prevent poisonings.)

    If your dog is big, check their belly daily for signs of bloat. Bloat is a potentially fatal condition that can develop quickly. If their belly is distended and sore to the touch, get them to the vet or clinic as quickly as possible.

    If your dog has difficulty urinating, if they are straining, or if there’s blood in their urine, take them to the vet without delay.

    If his eyes are often red, or they tear excessively, have the vet check them out. There are some potentially serious conditions that can harm their eyes and reduce his sight.

    If your dog doesn’t recover from strenuous activity after one day, or if they are disoriented or bumping into things, the vet should investigate.

    If your dog’s been struck by a car, or fallen to the ground, but shows no signs of injury, take him to the vet anyway. Dogs tend to be stoic about their injuries. They don’t complain much, yet the injury may worsens as days go by until serious harm results.
    Daily examination of your dog needn’t take a lot of time out of your day. It will, however, give your dog many more days of good health and great companionship


    Welcome to the Advice – Household Poisons –

    THE Advice of Rotty Ranch Crew & Friends

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    A typical home contains many products that can kill or harm a dog.

    You’ll find these household poisons in your kitchen, bathroom, laundry room, workshop and garage.

    Read the contents list and know what dangers each item presents to you and your dog.

    There are nontoxic replacements for some of these household poisons.

    Secure the rest where your dog can’t get into them and become another preventable poisoning statistic. Don’t make any room with toxic items their “home” when you’re out.

    They are far more likely to find and get into these poisons if she’s kept in that room day after day.

    In the Kitchen

    Typical household poisons found in the kitchen include caustic drain and oven cleaners, sink and counter cleaners, and window cleaners.

    Batteries are also dangerous.
    Depending on where you live, you may have ant, roach or rat poison in the kitchen.

    You may also have mousetraps; while not deadly, they will definitely cause some acute pain if your dog sets one off on their snout or paw.

    Use baking soda and boiling vinegar instead of drain cleaners to clear your blocked pipes.

    Use vinegar and newspapers to clean your windows.

    Seal all small holes in cupboards and walls to keep out vermin.

    Keep your counters and floors clean.

    Soon you’ll see your pest problem reduced to almost nothing.

    If you do use household poisons in the kitchen, store them in a high cupboard or pantry shelf, out of reach of your dog, or put a childproof latch on the inside of the cupboard door so they can’t open it and get into trouble.

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    In the Bathroom

    The bathroom is full of dangerous items: medications, toilet and sink/tub , soaps, shampoos, rubbing alcohol, and contact lens solutions.
    Many of these come in plastic containers, which your dog can easily chew through.
    Some of these items are not poisonous, but they will cause, at the very least, stomach distress. Others, such as human medications, can cause serious harm to your dog.

    Replace cleaners with nontoxic versions.

    Keep all medications in the medicine cabinet out of her reach.
    Do not leave shampoos and conditioners on the rim of the bathtub.
    Hang them from the shower head, or keep them in a cupboard under the sink.
    Secure the cupboard door with a childproof latch on the inside so that only you can open it.
    Leave the lid of the down at all times, especially if you use a blue cleaner that is always present in the bowl.

    While toilet water (without the blue cleaner) is considered by many experts to be nontoxic, it can still cause stomach upset due to bacteria in the bowl. If your dog becomes accustomed to drinking out of the bowl, she might drink from it one day while you’ve left it full of cleaning chemicals. If the toilet is near the sink, the lowered lid makes a handy midpoint for a small dog who wants to go exploring.

    Keep all jars and bottles off the vanity or counter top.

    In the Laundry Room.

    • Household poisons in the laundry room include bleach, detergents and fabric softeners.

      You might also have petroleum distillates in the form of heavy duty cleaners if someone in the family works on cars or other greasy machinery.

      Keep all laundry supplies secure on a high shelf or in a closed and latched cupboard.

    In the Workshop

    The workshop is home to many household poisons, including paints, varnishes and other finishes, hand cleaners, paint thinners and other petroleum distillates. Some of these are very toxic, and all can cause stomach upset or more serious problems.

    Do not leave open cans of paint or finish on the floor if your dog is in the house, or at ground level if you’re working outside and your pets are around you.

    When not in use, keep all cans on a high shelf or in a securely latched cupboard.

    Keep all distillate containers completely sealed (which also reduces fumes in the workshop and house) and out of their reach.

    In the Garage

    Household poisons in the garage include antifreeze, oil, gasoline, brake and transmission fluid, rock salt or salt substitutes for icy paths and drives, and lawn and garden chemicals, including fertilizers and pesticides.

    If you work on your car or truck at home, keep the floor clean of all spills.

    Antifreeze will kill your dog, quickly. they will be attracted to it because of its sweet taste.

    Clay-based cat litter is good for quickly absorbing drying spills; however, do not use it if you have a cat in the house.

    Keep all containers securely closed and out of their reach.

    Keep bags of fertilizer and pesticides well out of reach as well.

    If you’re continually on the lookout for household poisons around the house, you’ll prevent a possible, and definitely preventable, accident from ever causing your dog any harm.

    Healthy Home Made Dog Food Recipe

    This is a healthy addition to, or replacement for, your dog’s daily meals that they will happily devour.

  • 2 Chicken Leg Quarters
  • 1 Cup Brown Rice
  • 1 Pound Ground Beef
  • 2/3 Cup Rolled Oats
  • 1 (10 ounce) package chopped frozen Spinach, thawed and squeezed dry
  • 2 Cups Frozen Chopped Broccoli, Thawed
  • 1 (15 ounce) can kidney beans – rinsed, drained and mashed
  • 2 Carrots, Shredded
  • 1 Clove Garlic, Minced (optional)
  • 1 Cup Cottage Cheese
  • 1/2 Cup Olive Oil
  • PREP COOK READY IN
    45 mins 1 hr 30 mins 2 hrs 15 mins

    Directions

    1. Place the chicken leg quarters in a large pot, and fill with enough water to cover by 1 inch. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer 40 minutes. Remove the legs and allow to cool. Strain and return the cooking liquid to the pot. Once the legs have cooled. Remove and discard the skin and bones; chop the meat, and set aside.
    2. Stir the brown rice into the reserved chicken broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until the rice is tender, 45 to 50 minutes. Drain off any excess liquid, and add the rice to the bowl with the chicken.
    3. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat, and add the ground beef. Cook and stir until the beef is crumbly and no longer pink, about 7 minutes. Pour off any excess grease, and place the beef into the bowl. Stir in the oats, spinach, broccoli, kidney beans, carrots, garlic, cottage cheese, and olive oil. Store the dog food in resealable containers in the freezer. Thaw the daily portions overnight in the refrigerator.

    Cook’s Note:
    Dogs love the flavor of garlic, but too much will make them anemic. Use it sparingly or not at all.

    For variety, try adding one of the following:

      1/2 cup blueberries
      1/2 cup pumpkin in place of the carrots
      Cooked, cracked wheat in place of either the rice or oats
      Black beans or chickpeas, mashed, or lentils in place of the red kidney beans
      Steamed and finely chopped celery or cauliflower
      Steamed peas
      Shredded cheese
      Mild, cooked fish
      Scrambled eggs
      Fish oil in place of olive oil.

    Welcome to the Advice – Dog Proofing –

    THE Advice of Rotty Ranch Crew & Friends

    Product Images

    Did you dog proof your home before you got your dog?

    If not, they are at risk — every day — of poisoning, electrocution or injury. Thousands of dogs die each year from avoidable accidents in the home. Will your latest family member be one of them???

    Puppies, with their curiosity and need to chew, are particularly vulnerable.

    A dog loose in an unfenced yard is an accident waiting to happen. You can easily avoid all these incidents.

    Read these pages to help and learn how to protect your newest friend, then invest some time to dog proof your home and garden.

    You’ll reduce the chance of ever needing to use dog first aid. Remove or Secure Poisons. Poisoning is a very common, and very preventable, cause of harm to dogs.
    Dog proof your home by simply the removing or securing all poisonous products, including toxic cleaners and batteries. Remove Toxic Houseplants. Houseplants add beauty to a home, and many help clean the air. Some, however, are toxic to dogs and other pets.

    Dog proof your home by removing these toxic houseplants or placing them out of your dog’s (and children’s) reach.


    free Delivery on orders over £59

    Don’t Give Your Dog Toxic Foods There are foods that we all enjoy and perhaps even love but they are toxic to your dog. You can avoid canine health problems by refusing to give him "human" foods and providing a safe alternative.

    Reduce Electrocution and Other Hazards

    Every year, many dogs are electrocuted in the home. Others asphyxiate when they get tangled up in plastic bags, or choke on small items they swallow. Some tear their skin on a loose staple under a sofa or chair, or on a nail sticking out from the wall. Many more fall down stairs and seriously injure themselves. Secure your electric cords and remove or eliminate household hazards to help keep your dog safe inside your home.

    Avoid Using Toxic Garden Plants

    There are many plants for your garden that are dangerous for your dog. Some can result in death. Dog proof your garden by using some of the dozens of garden plants that aren’t toxic for your dog.

    Eliminate Outdoor Poisons

    Many dogs become ill due to the biocides used on lawns and gardens. Some plants are toxic to dogs. There are many safe ways to control unwanted plants, insects and diseases in your lawn and garden, and many safe plants that will add beauty.

    Rid your property of the dangerous ones and make your dog’s life safer.

    Add Fencing or a Restraint System

    A dog on the loose is a dog at risk of running onto the road, eating tainted garbage, or getting into a neighbor’s garden.

    Your dog will likely be injured or become ill sooner rather than later if they are allowed the run of the district/neighborhood.
    If you need to leave your dog outside, confine him to your own garden with a fence, stake and chain, or other restraint system.

    There are many different types of dog containment systems on the market these days. It’s important to find the system that works best for you and your dog.

    If you follow these simple steps to dog-proof your home, you’ll keep your canine companion safe, secure and healthy.

    That’s definitely worth the small investment in time and energy, isn’t it?

    Welcome to the Advice – Obedience Training –
    THE Advice of Rotty Ranch Crew & Friends
    Baby Lea & Mum
    Dog obedience training to keep your dog safe at home, and your property.

    Away from home, they need dog obedience training so that you can maintain control of any unusual or provocative situations. A dog who obeys is one who’ll be safe wherever they go.

    Obedience training comes in many forms.

    You can train your dog on your own, or use a professional obedience trainer. You can also use books, videos or online resources if you prefer to train her on your own.

    The choice is yours. To help you pick the training method that’s right for you and your dog, review the information on the following pages.

    Teaching the “Wait” Dog Command to your Dog
    Waiting can be a difficult thing. For anyone, especially your pet dog, learning to wait is an important skill, and one that will not come without adequate understanding and training.

    The “Wait” dog command is very useful, especially if you’d like for your dog to be reliable even when they are not on their leash. Look at this dog command as a safety command, to keep your pet safe from potential dangers.

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    free Delivery on orders over £59

    With Dog Containment Systems

    You Have Many Options In-ground or electric dog Fences are a great way to safely contain your dog and give them the freedom to play. Dog Fences are quite easy to install and if you’re not hot on the idea of burying wire, you’ll be happy to know that burying the wire isn’t mandatory.

    Proof Training
    Before learning about the types of dog training, please read this article on proof training for the importance of making your dog’s obedience training real-world relevant. Whether you attend a class, have private training, or train your dog yourself using a book or video, a trainer is involved.
    Learn how to pick the trainer and the training style that best suits you and your dog.

    Choosing a Trainer

    Invest some of your precious time and money on dog obedience training.
    Your return on investment?

    Years of love, devotion and obedience from that friend down by your side.

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    Benefits of Dog Obedience Training
    There are many types of training however by and large the most popular and most effective type of training embraces positive reinforcement training techniques. This means you’re not only helping your dog to learn new behaviors, you’re providing structure, a social structure for your home, and you’re creating a bond with your dog.
    Basic Dog Training is easy when you do it right. Learn basic Dog Training with this free mini course.