For The Love Of All Our Pets
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Some of the dogs you’ll find in a rescue shelter may have been abused or neglected. Others are found abandoned or handed in for a range of other reasons Certain breeds, such as Staffordshire Bull Terriers, languish in homes due to preconceived notions of aggressive behaviour. In reality of course, these dogs make for some of the most loving and dependable pets, so try not to judge the breed, only the deed.

When taking home, a rescue dog, it is essential to properly prepare for the commitment, patience and training required when re homing one of these dogs.

Before

Prepare the Family – Lay down the ground rules for the whole family and ensure they stick to them. Set boundaries and, in particular, ensure your children know that the new dog is not a toy. Make sure they know to respect the dog’s space. Coming into unfamiliar territory will take a few weeks for your rescue dog to adjust.
Give it Time – Know that when your dog arrives you’ll need to give it time for them to settle in. Especially in the first 3 weeks, use a warm tone when addressing him/her but try not to handle them too much and give them time to relax.
Many owners make the mistake of over handling their new dog and introducing him /her to all the family and friends within the first few days. Often this overwhelms the dog and they sometimes nip out of fear. Then what happens?…….they end up back at the shelter! GIVE THEM SOME SPACE!
Pay little attention to the dog’s advances at this time to establish dog style leadership. Honestly they will relax more if you sometimes ignore their demands for attention …it’s what happens in a dog pack.
Sleeping Arrangements – Provide a warm, comfortable area for your dog to sleep in. Your dog should also sleep beneath/away from other family members to establish its place in the pack. I recommend getting a crate as this gives your rescue dog a safe and dark area to retreat to while they adjust to a new environment. If your dog is sleeping, make sure family members know not to disturb him/her.
Identification – Micro chipping and traditional collars are a good way to ensure you can find your dog if he/she were to become lost. Especially in the beginning, noise or lack of training might trigger your dog to run away. Be prepared for this. Also, if you’re uncertain about how they’ll react to other dogs then consider buying a muzzle to have better control over him/her while you’re out walking.
Secure your Garden – Before your dog’s arrival, make sure you have a secure garden or area you can let him/her explore. Make a habit of scattering some of their dog food and fresh fruit and veg in the garden. This let the dog feel more secure in its surroundings. It’s also a lot more natural and fun to sniff out their food rather than eat it out of a bowl.
Training

Discipline – Use ONE word in a low tone to indicate when your dog has done wrong. A different word delivered in a soft tone should be used for praise. Use as few words as possible when interacting with your dog and never tell your dog off by using his/her name.
Body Language – This is an essential part of training as dogs mirror our own body language. Avoid aggressive handling of your dog i.e. tapping its nose or grabbing the scruff of its collar. Other than your key words for discipline and praise, adopt a steady and soft tone when communicating with your dog. Use your own body language to indicate what you’re trying to communicate. Be patient with your rescue dog during this time.
Leadership – Make sure your dog doesn’t pull on its lead but walks beside you. If out in the park, use a long training lead first to ensure your rescue dog knows who its new pack is and will come back to you. When at home, make sure you keep him/her from running to the door when someone calls. It’s your home so you answer the door.
You must be the dog’s leader not its follower!
Care

Separation – Try to establish separation between you and your dog. Taking him/her everywhere you go will only create problems if you eventually have to leave them for short periods of time. If you do go out for the day, then make sure your dog has a constant supply of water and some crunchy vegetables to eat.
Speaking their language – Show your rescue dog plenty of love and patience while they settle into their new environment. Communicate with your dog in a way that he/she will understand. Simple tones, few words and clear body language will ensure your new dog knows its leader.
Most of all have FUN with your new dog!

Most dogs like being made a fuss of, having attention given or engaging in games of play, however, sometimes their attention seeking antics can become a bit of a nuisance. How often have you sat down after a hard day’s work, only to find a toy being thrust in our laps, or wet noses nudged against our elbows or our legs prodded and poked by insistent, demanding paws? Admittedly such advances can seem quite cute and endearing, so we often cave in and respond immediately by rewarding our dog with the validation it so desperately craves, little realising the potential significance of our actions. Before long, we find it is us being trained by the dog, rather than the other way around.

I frequently encounter clients whose dogs seem to be running the show at home and who’ve skillfully manipulated the situation in their favour by deciding when and where they get stroked and for how long they get stroked. If this is the case, there’s a chance your dog thinks it has control over you, it follows that we ought not to be so surprised when they feel justified in not paying the slightest attention to us when we need them to listen.

One tenet of good leadership at home is making sure you are in control of affection and play times. Put simply, instead of acquiescing to your dog’s request, you must be the one who initiates it by giving them a clear signal to come over to you. That way, not only have they adhered to your recall command, but you’ve demonstrated good leadership.

It is often said the best way in which to ‘love’ a dog is with boundaries.

I frequently encounter clients, whom, by their own admission have done a good job of totally spoiling their dog by indulging its every whim and fancy, with scant regard for sensible boundaries or limitations. For it is the absence of these same boundaries which has undoubtedly in some way contributed towards the behavioural problems they’re now facing.

Human love and emotions are fairly abstract concepts to the canine brain, which has little understanding of the peculiarities in the human world, and prefers instead to occupy itself with the instincts for survival. The reasons we find ourselves going all gushy and gooey-eyed over our furry companions have more to do with satisfying our own emotional needs and fulfilling our nurturing instincts, than necessarily benefitting our dogs, which is why I am keen to stress to my clients, the importance of striking a happy balance between meeting our desires and the needs of the dog.

At home, we set arbitrary boundaries for our children, such as; Do your homework, take your shoes off, eat your vegetables or don’t stay out late, none of which the children particularly like or enjoy, but we do so for their own benefit and future development. Yet often, the same can’t be said with regard to setting sensible house rules and boundaries for our four-legged friends to whom we often afford a totally free reign, particularly the smaller varieties.

Start from the beginning as you mean to go on, whether it’s a new puppy or a rehomed dog that you’re bringing into the home, by setting the rules and being consistent in their application, because blurred margins or changeable rules can be confusing for a dog and may cause stress.

Rottweiler Puppies – Rottie Pressies Time

25/12/2009

Santa Visits Rotty Pups –

Captured Live on Ustream at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/rotty-pups

Rottweiler Puppies – The Crew Meet Snow

25/12/2009

Playing In The Snow –

Captured Live on Ustream at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/rotty-pups

Attack Of The Rottwieller Puppies

20/12/2009

10 Rottweiler Puppies Playing With Human Dad

12 Rottweiler Puppies Trash The Lounge In Play

20/12/2009

Rottweiler Play Time –

Captured Live on Ustream at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/rotty-pups

Rottweiler Puppies Get More New Beds…

Puppy Bed –

Captured Live on Ustream at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/rotty-pups

13/12/2009

Sunday Afternoon Playtime With Daddy – Part Two

13/12/2009

Rottweiler Puppy Crew Relaxing Sunday Afternoon Play With daddy –

Captured Live on Ustream at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/rotty-pups

Sunday Afternoon Playtime With Rottweiler Daddy – But Would Rather Just

13/12/2009

Relaxing sunday Afternoon Play With Human Daddy –

Captured Live on Ustream at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/the-crew-camera-number-2

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