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Training Tips

How Well Is Your Rottweiler Groomed?

The reason one should groom his/her Rottweiler is simple – your dog’s physical state influences the way he feels and the way you look at your dog. Extreme cases, where lack of proper care, cleaning and grooming can directly affect the behavior of your Rottweiler, are not rare.

Proper grooming not only infuses a healthy glow to your dog’s appearance, but also helps develop his self-esteem; while it makes you a very proud parent, when you show off your Rottweiler to others.

The first step involved in dog grooming is: Brushing!

Brushing has been universally acknowledged by expert dog groomers as the single most important step in grooming.

The benefits of brushing are many. To name a few:

  • Better blood circulation
  • Shinier and healthier coat
  • Better bonding

Subscribe to this FREE dog grooming mini course and learn more about brushing and combing and other grooming tools and their applications.

Even if you know how crucial brushing is for your Dog’s health and well-being, we all know that there is a right way and a wrong way of doing anything. And without doubt, you would like to do everything the RIGHT way when it comes to your Rottweiler.

Yes, there’s a method to follow while brushing your Rottweiler.

Here are FIVE steps to successfully brushing your Rottweiler that will prove to be extremely useful:

  • Brush against the growth of the hair first with a slicker brush and then with a medium or wide-toothed comb.
  • The slicker brush removes all the loose hair and the comb takes care of the tangles.
  • Brush your Rottweiler along the hair growth and make sure you reach the skin as you brush his way.
  • Then use a flea comb over the coat to get the fleas and remove any remaining tangles. Part the coat and start from the root and then comb through.
  • If your Dog’s paw pads are hairy, then clip them using electric clippers. Do not clip the hair in between the pads. Clip only the excess hair.

Brush your Dog’s hairs to prevent it from matting. Matting can be a very painful experience.

Regular brushing untangles the matted hairs on your Dog’s coat. Since this is a risky job to do, the best way out is to prevent them from forming in the first place. And doing this is simple: just brush and comb your Rottweiler regularly. If and when you see any mats or tangles, use a detangle solution and a medium-toothed comb.

Don’t wait until your Rottweiler is dirty or matted to introduce him to grooming. That would make him associate the experience with unpleasantness. Moreover, many dogs learn to see their routine brushing as an alternate form of petting, i.e. another source of affection and attention.

Subscribe to this FREE dog grooming mini course and start Grooming your Dog all by yourself right from the comfort of your home Today.

Copyright (c) 2009 TrainPetDog.com

Is Your Rottweiler Potty Trained Enough?

House Training a puppy or adult Rottweiler is such an essential issue for its owner that even a single exclusive tip turns out to be extremely helpful. Whilst your dog is growing up, it is imperative that your Rottweiler potty trained enough.

The first step in making your Rottweiler fit for polite company would be to potty train him. Some see this training as a hassle and some as a challenge.

For me, it is part of bringing up a pet.

Click here to subscribe to a FREE course on housetraining puppies and dogs.

There are a few things you need to know before you actually start potty training a puppy or adult Rottweiler. I enumerate these below:

Understanding The Basics.

  • You need to understand your dog’s body language. Watch for signs that will indicate to you when your pet wants to eliminate.
  • If you own puppies, remember that they need to go potty at fairly frequent intervals – as soon as they wake up, after short naps, after play-time, after meals, before and after being crated and finally, before retiring for the night.
  • Take your Rottweiler for walks at the time that he usually does his potty. Take him out to the yard and then to the same place there every time he needs to answer nature’s call.
  • Praise your Rottweiler after he eliminates at the right place. Some Rottweiler owners even give treats to their dogs. But remember to do this every time he does it right. He will relate the rewards to his having “done it right” and zero in on the spot where you want him to defecate regularly.
  • With time, you can try signal training. This is so that you know when your doggie wants to go. You can hang a bell at his level near the door and teach him to push it with his nose or pat it with his paw on his way out.
  • Until your Rottweiler has been fully potty trained keep him under strict vigilance. Do not let him roam around the house freely.
  • Use a crate. A crate-trained Rottweiler is usually very happy to get his own den. The advantage of crating is that dogs do not soil the place where they sleep. So, he will naturally not eliminate inside the crate.
  • If you have a small dog and if you live in a high-rise building or in a place that does not have a proper backyard, you can try litter pan training. What you do is create a space for your pet to eliminate in your house itself.

    Positive Reinforcements

  • Use positive reinforcements while housebreaking puppies or adult dogs. Do not scold or hit him as you will gain nothing by doing that. He will only associate punishment with your return from outside. If you catch him in the act, a stern ‘NO’ or ‘FREEZE’ will do. It will startle the Rottweiler enough for him to stop pooping.
  • Be prepared to return to a soiled home if you are keeping your Rottweiler home alone for more than 4 hours as separation anxiety is quite common among home – alone dogs.
  • Accidents will happen. It is unusual for a trained adult Rottweiler to work against its house training. But medical problems or health disorders may lead to sudden accidents.
  • Many dogs mark their territory. These can be a leg of a table or a particular wall. Intact male and female dogs mark their territories by urinating. Use deodorizers to spray on the places where your Rottweiler has marked.

    Are You Ready

  • If you are patient and are ready to accept that house training a dog takes time, even months sometimes, you will end up having a good housetrained Rottweiler.

Click here to subscribe to a FREE course on house training puppies and dogs.

Now we will move on to how to potty train puppies and adult dogs.

Potty Training A Puppy:

Irrespective of breeds, house training a puppy is considered to be one of the biggest challenges by dog owners. If you think house training your puppy simply involves a steady supply of old newspapers, then think again.

A puppy does not develop full control over his bladder until it is over 4 or 5 months old. Since they are growing and developing rapidly at this time, puppies eat more, burn more calories and need to eliminate more frequently than an adult Rottweiler.

After each nap, meal, drink or play, take your puppy to his designated area (indoors or outdoors, wherever you have decided) and stay there until it eliminates. Then bring him to his crate.

Repeat this situation everyday until he has developed a habit out of it.

Click here to subscribe to a FREE course on housebreaking a puppy.

Potty Training An Adult Rottweiler:

The best way to house train an adult Rottweiler is to begin all over again.

Observe him very closely. Maybe even maintain a diary of where he goes and when. Whether he is pooping when you are home or only when you are outside; whether you can time yourself to be home when he feels the need to go outside.

You can try dog crates, but be careful to introduce him gradually to them.

Click here to subscribe to a FREE course on potty training a dog.

Remember, commitment, consistency and intelligent use of positive reinforcement will make you the owner of a perfectly housetrained Rottweiler. Don’t expect miracles. You will only be disappointed.

Get this FREE course on potty training a dog.

Get this unique House training guide and start Housebreaking Your Rottweiler Today

Welcome to the Advice & Support Pages – Puppy & Dog First Aid

THE Advice of Rotty Ranch Crew & Friends

If your canine companion is an active dog, a fully stocked, quality puppy & dog first aid kit could be the difference between life and death, health and permanent disability, or a pain-free life and ongoing suffering. It should go without say that any good animal lover will always have a Puppy & Dog First Aid kit to hand.

A first aid kit for a dog or other pet has many of the same supplies and tools as a kit for humans, such as scissors, gauze and an antiseptic for cleansing wounds.

There are some important differences, however, particularly pain medications.

Many medications developed for human use are dangerous, even fatal, to pets. You need to ensure that your puppy & dog first aid kit has pain medications developed for your pet.

The best way to do that is to create your own canine first aid kit, or purchase one of the many available in stores and online.
If you’re someone who likes to customize, I’ve included a list of essential and recommended items:

Dog First Aid Supplies for your kit.

Accidents happen.
To dogs, to other pets, to people.

These puppy & dog first aid supplies are just what you need to give your dog a fighting chance until you get her to the vet.

These dog first aid supplies are divided into five sections: tools, supplies for external use, supplies for internal use, items to comfort your dog, and the container to carry them in.

Some supplies may only come in large quantities. To save space in your kit, consider adding only enough to help your dog for several hours. Take along enough for a day or two if you’re at a hunting camp or other isolated spot.

Don’t forget two very important items.

  • A book on dog first aid is vital.
  • You can’t know everything that can happen to your dog, or how to treat it.
  • First Buy a dog first aid book that’s small enough to fit into your kit, yet at the same time large enough to have the information you need.

    Click here to subscribe to a FREE course on house training puppies and dogs.

    And read it.

    Before you need it.

    The second important item to have with your puppy & dog first aid supplies is clean water. Your dog will need fluids to help your dog survive.
    If you’ve ever become sick from drinking unclean (or even unfamiliar) water, you know how unpleasant it can be.
    If your dog is injured or ill, the last thing she needs is a stomach bug or upset.
    If you’re traveling by car, take at least a gallon (four liters) of water with you.

    Tools

    Any animal in pain, even your dog, may snap at you or try to bite as you clean a scrape or close a wound. The first thing you should do is muzzle them.
    You can purchase a muzzle, or take strips of pantyhose or other material to tie around her snout.
    Learn Dog Handling techniques to help you muzzle and restrain your dog.
    Other necessary tools for your puppy & dog first aid supplies include the following.

  • Needle and thread, or a skin stapler
  • Razor blade (paper wrapped for protection)
  • Small blunt end scissors
  • Tweezers
  • Hemostat forceps
  • Rectal thermometer made specifically for dogs
  • Tongue depressors or ice cream sticks (can also be used as splints)
  • Oral syringe (3 cc) for administering liquid oral medicines, or for getting an ear drying solution into your dog’s ears
  • Eye dropper (instead of the syringe)
  • Oral syringe (10 cc) for cleaning and flushing wounds
  • Safety pins in several sizes
  • Small empty containers for pain pills and medications
  • Rubber gloves
  • Instant ice compress
  • Tourniquet
  • Splints
  • Washcloth
  • Nail trimmers
  • Supplies for External
  • Use Your dog is likely to suffer from far more external injuries than internal injuries or illnesses. These can range from scrapes and scratches, to bites and stings, to open wounds and punctures. These puppy & dog first aid supplies will help you clean and stabilize any wound, small or large.

  • Sterile non-stick pads (2″ x 4″)
  • Cotton gauze pads •Cotton gauze wrap (1.5″ width and/or 3″ width) •VetWrap™ (2″ width and/or 4″ width)
  • Ace bandage (self adhering)
  • Regular Band-Aids
  • New Skin liquid bandage or “Mole Skin” (to quickly repair splits in pads)
  • First aid tape or 1″ vet tape
  • Cotton balls and swabs
  • Small bottle of isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol
  • Alcohol or antiseptic wipes (the ones that come in small individual packets)
  • Bottle (at least 8 ounces/225 ml) of 3% hydrogen peroxide (for cleaning wounds and to induce vomiting when necessary)
  • Iodine wash
  • Eye wash
  • Antibiotic ointment (Neosporin, Bacitracin, Betadine or generic)
  • Ophthalmic (eye) antibiotic ointment
  • Small jar of Vaseline
  • Problem Trips

    If you live in, or plan to visit, tick country, add one or two small plastic bottles with tight seals to your puppy & dog first aid supplies. Before you go, label them “Ticks” and partially fill them with rubbing alcohol.

    If you find a tick on yourself or your dog, remove it and put it into one of these bottles. The alcohol will kill and preserve the tick in case identification is required later.

    Supplies for Internal Use

    Your dog may, at some point, eat something toxic or that doesn’t agree with her. These dog first aid supplies will help with most GI and poisoning problems.

  • Activated charcoal (for absorption of ingested toxic substances)
  • Syrup of Ipecac (to induce vomiting; do not use if your dog has ingested acids, alkalis, or petroleum products) — use only syrup of Ipecac; forms other than syrup can be fatal to dogs and humans
  • Hydrogen peroxide (to induce vomiting; do not use if your dog has ingested acids, alkalis, or petroleum products)
  • Anti-gas tablets (for digestive problems)
  • Imodium tablets or generic brand (for diarrhea)
  • Pepto Bismol tablets (for digestive trouble) •Kaopectate or generic brand These items will help you relieve your dog’s pain or allergy symptoms.
  • Buffered aspirin or ascriptin (5 grain, use a child’s dose) Never give your dog Tylenol (liver problems) or ibuprofen (can be fatal). Consult with your veterinarian when collecting your puppy & dog first aid supplies about the correct dosage for any “human” painkillers you want to use
  • Benadryl 25 mg tabs or generic brand (for allergic reactions; use a child’s dose) Always keep on hand as part of your dog first aid supplies a small amount of any prescription or non-prescription medicine your dog needs regularly (remember to rotate this at least monthly).
  • Items To Comfort Your Dog

    These items will keep your dog warm if needed. If your dog is injured, they may suffer from shock; any of these items will help control the symptoms.

  • A towel and a blanket (folded as a pillow for her head or to keep body parts elevated; useful as a makeshift gurney to lift and move you dog and for carrying her to the car)
  • “Space” blanket or other heat-reflective blanket
  • Optional and Miscellaneous Supplies

    Home Puppy & Dog First Aid Kit.

    The following dog first aid supplies are useful to keep in a home kit. Consider taking all or some of them if you go traveling.

  • An eye ointment
  • An ointment for ear infections
  • An ear cleaning solution (Epi-Otic, Nolvasan Otic, or your favourite)
  • An ear drying solution
  • Epsom salts
  • Hot spot remedy ingredients If you’ve ever tried to do any fine detail work in low-light conditions, you know the value of having a candle or flashlight with you. If you always have a light source with you anyway, you won’t need to include one with your other dog first aid supplies.
  • Small flashlight
  • Matches
  • Small candle
  • Small hair trimming scissors
  • Latex (rubber) gloves
  • Measuring spoons
  • Iodine tablets (if you hike or camp, water may not be safe for drinking without treatment or boiling)
    Otoscope (for examining your dog’s ears)
  • The Container
  • The Container

    A suitable container is a very important part of your dog first aid kit. You need a container that’s big enough to fit all the dog first aid supplies you’ve purchased.

    It should also give you access to everything inside. At the same time, it needs to be small enough that you won’t begrudge taking it with you when you travel.

    You might want to consider creating two kits: a smaller one with only the essentials for use when you’re out for a walk or at the beach, and a larger, more complete kit with the dog first aid supplies to handle just about any emergency.

    For a small kit with just the essentials, useful when out for a walk or a day at the beach or park, consider a red or other light-colored fanny pack.

    Use one with multiple pockets.

    Many today come with four or more pockets, two large ones in the main section, and a smaller one on either side. The small ones are useful for carrying pills and medications.
    For a larger kit for home or travel use, consider a nylon briefcase with zippers down the sides. Buy a red one, or one in another light color.
    Most come with a large interior compartment, a large exterior compartment in the back, and another one in the flap. They also come with small pockets and pen holders.
    The pen holders are useful for scissors, tweezers and forceps, while the pockets can hold bandages, a washcloth, or cotton swabs.
    If you take your dog hunting, or enter a lot of agility competitions, you may need a more extensive list of dog first aid supplies, and a larger box to fit them.
    Consider using a fishing tackle box. These boxes have trays that lift up and out when the lid is opened, giving access to the lower compartment. The trays are useful for the smaller objects, while the main compartment can hold the bottles, tools and bulkier items.
    Many tackle boxes are black plastic. Scout around for one in a lighter color, grey or green. You want to be able to label your first aid kit with a permanent marker. A black box will require white markings with paint or correction fluid.

    Include Important Information

    On the outside of your fanny pack, briefcase or tackle box, with permanent marker, write “Dog First Aid” on all exposed sides. This will help others locate and use your kit should the need arise.
    Create a card with the following information, then carry it inside your fanny pack, tape it to the back of the large inside compartment of your briefcase, or tape it to the inside of the tackle box lid.

  • Your name, address and phone number
  • Name and phone number of a contact person, who, in an emergency, will take care of your dog if you cannot
  • Your dog’s name and information about any medications she takes (including dose and frequency), any allergies or significant medical conditions she has
  • Name and phone number of your veterinarian
  • Puppy & Dog First Aid Kit Contents Card.

    Create another card to tape alongside the contact and medical information. On this one, write a list of common medications and preparations, such as pain relievers, along with their general dosages, and the specific dose for your dog, based on her weight. With your dog’s specific dose requirements listed, you won’t have to try to do the math in your head, or fumble around with a calculator, when you should be concentrating on treating your companion.

  • Aspirin 5 mg per pound every 12 hours
  • Benadryl 1 – 2 mg per pound every 8 hours
  • Imodium 1 mg per 15 pounds 1-2 times daily
  • Kaopectate 5 ml per 5 pounds every 2 hours
  • Mineral oil (as a laxative) 5 – 30 ml per day, but do not use it long-term
  • Pepto Bismol 5 ml per 25 pounds every 6 hours
  • Hydrogen peroxide (to induce vomiting) 5 ml per 10 pounds; give a second dose after 10 minutes; do not give a third dose
  • Veterinarian Advice

    Have your veterinarian confirm the dosages before you use any of them. If the symptoms you are treating persist, consult your vet immediately as the problem may be more serious than you first thought.
    Tylenol can cause liver problems in dogs, so do not use it instead of aspirin. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, etc.) is fatal to dogs at low doses.

    Use only aspirin for relieving your dog’s pain. Aspirin can cause stomach ulcers in your dog, so watch her closely for signs of stomach upset. Use buffered aspirin or ascriptin to minimize these stomach problems.
    Also keep copies of your dog’s medical information in your kit, including vaccination records, her rabies certificate, and any medications that she needs. If you travel a lot with your dog, consider making a separate package of records for each car. See Information and Records for more on what types of information you’ll need for emergencies.

    Invest some time packing and repacking the fanny pack, briefcase or tackle box. Ensure that the most commonly used dog first aid supplies, like the bandages and antibiotic ointment or cream, are near the top or in an accessible pocket.

    We hope you never have to use any of these dog first aid supplies on your dog, or any dog. But if you do, you’ll be glad you invested the time to collect these dog first aid supplies and put together or customize a first aid kit.

    THE Advice of Rotty Ranch Crew & Friends

    Welcome to the Advice & Support Pages

    Has there ever a time when dog first aid would have reduced your dog’s pain and suffering?

    Or perhaps even saved the life of a poisoned or injured dog?

    For one i know that the advice and support i have received whilst chatting to the Crew Online Aunties & Uncles, the advice I have received has been spectacular. For this reason alone, we are trying to create some basic points that might help you, should you be having problems or need advice. You could also check out the details of things that have happened to the Crew & Friends to find out how their human families responded.

    First aid for dogs, just like first aid for humans, is an effective combination of knowledge, supplies and skills, put into action for the benefit of your four-legged friend.
    Along with a clear head and a good supply of confidence, anyone, including a child, can use them to save a dog’s life. Dog First Aid will help you with all of them, including the confidence.

    Avoiding Emergencies

    As important as it is to know what to do during a emergency , and how to do it, it’s possibly far more important to avoid the situations that put dogs at risk. Prevention is always and always will be far better than cure.

    All dogs, especially inquisitive puppies and poorly trained dogs, get into mischief. This can lead to poisoning from ingesting a cleaning product or chewing on a toxic houseplant, asphyxiating on a small object found on the floor, or electrocution from chewing an electric cord. Outdoor hazards like toxic garden plants and pesticides are equally dangerous. Time invested dog-proofing your home will prevent such incidents.

    • A calm dog is a safer dog. She’s much less likely to bolt into traffic or hurt herself trying to hide from a thunderstorm. And if she suffers from separation anxiety, she can get into a lot of trouble while you’re out. Learn ways to calm her and relieve her anxiety.
    • A daily check helps you keep up with changes in your dog, so you can catch them early, before they worsen. Regular Grooming helps prevent ear and eye infections, along with hot spots and skin conditions. Daily brushing keeps her teeth and gums healthy, and regular exercise keeps her whole body healthy. All of these activities give her the attention she needs and craves, which helps with behavioral problems.
    • Activities away from home are also dangerous. Your dog can be seriously hurt, and even injure other passengers, in a traffic accident. She needs to be restrained while in the car, for her safety and yours. Learn why it’s important to put a canine float coat on them when she’s in the boat or even swimming. And learn why it’s even more important to put a reflective safety vest on her if you take her hunting with you.
    • An obedient dog is a safer dog. If she’s trained to obey you, you’ll be able to control her in unusual and provocative situations. Learn about the value of proof-training her so she’s ready for real-world experiences. Also learn how to pick a professional dog trainer who suits your learning style, and your dog’s.

    Prevention can’t remove all risk to your dog. Preparation is important for effective treatment of any injury or illness.

    • If you live in an area subject to floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, forest fires, tornadoes, volcanoes or even toxic waste spills, you need a disaster plan, an evacuation kit and a dog first aid kit for you and your dog. Nowhere in recent memory has this been so clearly demonstrated as it was with Hurricane Katrina, which left thousands of pets stranded as their owners had to leave them behind in their race to safety.
    • You’ll need a dog first aid kit. You can put one together yourself, to suit your dog’s needs. Or you can buy a prepackaged dog first aid kit, and customize it with extra supplies. Now is the time to become familiar with the supplies in a canine first aid kit.
    • If you’re familiar with the signs and symptoms of illnesses and injuries that can harm your dog, you can provide the right aid faster, and more confidently. Learn how to recognize the signs of poisoning, illness and shock. Read up on how to determine if she has broken bones after an accident. Know the symptoms of illnesses and diseases that are common in your dog’s breed.Also read a dog first aid book and the information here in Dog First Aid 101 so that you’ll know what to do if you ever have to treat her. It’s very hard to concentrate, and even harder to learn, when you’re panicked. Prepare now so you don’t panic later.

    During Emergencies

    You’ll need to act quickly and correctly if your dog, or any other dog, is seriously ill, injured or poisoned. Learn what dog first aid to provide in various situations to relieve her suffering and keep her alive until the veterinarian can take over.

    Serious injuries mean handling your dog carefully and transporting her to the veterinary clinic. You’ll have to lift her in a way that limits any further damage, and minimizes her pain.

    What You’ll Find Here

    Dog First Aid 101 is your source for information on all these aspects of canine care. Throughout the site, you’ll find links to valuable resources, along with recommendations for products to help you keep your dog healthy and safe. We’re here to help you help your dog, so that she’ll continue to live a long, happy life.

    May You Never Need It

    I hope you never have to use any of the emergency and first aid information and resources you’ll find in Dog First Aid 101. And I hope you’ll use all of the prevention and preparation information, so that your dog can continue to live a happy, healthy life with you.

    Don’t Put It Off

    Planning and preparing for your dog’s emergency are like writing your will — they’re not something many of us want to do, or even consider. But just like a will, you do need to have them, for your dog’s sake. You’ll feel better knowing that you can keep your dog alive and reduce her suffering during any emergency situation.

    Welcome to the Rottweiler Web Site

    Welcome to the Advice – Dogs Daily Teeth & Gum Routine

    Product Images


    Let’s Begin Cleaning Your Dogs Teeth

    It’s so easy, Wet the toothbrush and put a small dab of their doggy toothpaste on it.

    Start brushing one of the upper canines, using a circular motion at the gum line.
    Brush for five to ten seconds, then repeat on the other fang.
    Next, the upper fourth premolars.

    There is an uncomfortable way to brush these teeth, and a comfortable way.

    The uncomfortable method involves pulling back his lip all the way until you expose the tooth, then brushing.

    Here’s the comfortable way. Draw an imaginary vertical line from his eye down to his mouth.

    This is where you’ll find the fourth premolar.

    Dental neglect can cause serious health problems. That is why it is so important to begin a home dental program for your dog.

    Here are some simple recommendations to get started:
    Start by getting a good toothbrush. We’ve tested a lot of different dental care products and would recommend the Kissable Toothbrush from the Cain & Able dental collection. This really is a great brush – especially for those of you who are new to this whole "doggy tooth brushing" thing.

    Push their lip back briefly to check. You’re looking for the largest triangular tooth.

    If it’s directly below their eye, you now know where to find it.

    Wet the brush again and put more toothpaste on it. Slide the brush along between his lip and his gum until it’s even with his eye.
    Brush for 5 to 10 seconds, using a circular motion, up near the gum line. Locate the tooth on the other side and brush it.

    Simple, wasn’t it?
    Doing this once a day and you will eliminate much of the plaque buildup that leads to tartar and dog dental disease.

    Once you’re comfortable with cleaning your dogs teeth every day, you can extend your daily dog dental care to the remaining 38 teeth. Brush the outer surface of each tooth in a circular motion. Once you’re good at it, you should be done in as little as two minutes. Two minutes a day for a lifetime of Cleaning your dog’s teeth and healthy gums. That’s what dog-dental care is all about!

    Two Things To Note

    Your dog will probably chew on his brush while it’s in his mouth. It won’t do any harm, and will help clean other tooth surfaces. When you first start brushing and Cleaning your dog’s teeth, especially if you just their his teeth cleaned, you may see some blood on the toothbrush.

    DO NOT PANIC…
    This blood is leaking out from the gums.

    It’s a sign that his gums are inflamed (a dark red color instead of pink) or that you’re either brushing too hard or using a back-and-forth motion instead of a circular motion.

    Prevention can’t remove all risk to your dog. Preparation is important for effective treatment of any injury or illness.

    • If you live in an area subject to floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, forest fires, tornadoes, volcanoes or even toxic waste spills, you need a disaster plan,an evacuation kit and a dog first aid kit for you and your dog. Nowhere in recent memory has this been so clearly demonstrated as it was with Hurricane Katrina, which left thousands of pets stranded as their owners had to leave them behind in their race to safety.

    • You’ll need a dog first aid kit. You can put one together yourself, to suit your dog’s needs. Or you can buy a prepackaged dog first aid kit, and customize it with extra supplies. Now is the time to become familiar with the supplies in a canine first aid kit.

    • If you’re familiar with the signs and symptoms of illnesses and injuries that can harm your dog, you can provide the right aid faster, and more confidently. Learn how to recognize the signs of poisoning, illness and shock. Read up on how to determine if she has broken bones after an accident. Know the symptoms of illnesses and diseases that are common in your dog’s breed.

      Also read a dog first aid book and the information here in Dog First Aid 101 so that you’ll know what to do if you ever have to treat her. It’s very hard to concentrate, and even harder to learn, when you’re panicked. Prepare now so you don’t panic later.

    Welcome to the Rottweiler Web Site

    Welcome to the Advice – Regular Exercise

    Dogs Regular Exercise Routine

    Regular exercise for your dog is as important to her good health as exercise is to your good health.

    Dogs are naturally active animals, and while they’re more than happy to lounge about the house with you, they love to get out and explore, have fun, and make new friends in the neighborhood.

    Regular exercise for your dog doesn’t mean doing the same thing over and over, day in and day out. Different types of exercise benefit different parts of your dog’s body.

    Changing the exercise routine or the type of exercise cuts down on her boredom and stimulates her mind.

    Be careful not to over-exercise them. Too much exercise can be very damaging if they are a puppy. Too much exercise can worsen an inherited tendency toward hip dyspepsia. It can also put extra strain her developing bones and joints. Just like a small child who needs naps throughout the day, your puppy needs plenty of rest, naps and quiet time.

    Exercise should be gentle and brief. they will keep going as long as they can, just to be with you and please you, so you need to watch for signs of fatigue or perhaps even pain.

    The same holds true for older dogs.

    While exercise is very good for dogs with arthritis, too much can tire them out. Older dogs can’t take the level or period of exercise they could when they were younger. Watch for signs of fatigue in your older dog. Bring them in, or end the exercise period, at the first sign of them tiring.

    Some Ideas For Exercising Your Dog

    Here are some great ways to provide regular exercise for your dog, and some of the benefits from each.

    Daily walks allow you both to get out. While walks don’t provide as much exercise as other activities, they’re also a great way to increase your bonding time with her
    (see Spend Time With Your Dog for more on the importance of this).

    Walks also stimulate them mentally by giving them new scents to explore.

    Playing catch, or fetch, with them offers a lot of exercise doing something dogs love to do — chase after and retrieve an object.
    It seems the faster the object goes, the more dogs like playing catch. The beauty of catch is that it never feels like regular exercise for your dog; it’s just fun.

    Don’t throw stones or rocks for her to catch, or even fetch. They can break her teeth, or wear them down to the point where the pulp is exposed, which can be very painful.

    Even an indoor dog can benefit from playing catch.

    Instead of throwing the ball, roll it down a long hallway and watch them chase after it. This type and amount of exercise may be all they need to remain healthy.

    Many walks involve encounters with other dogs. If you don’t meet dogs on your walks, consider taking your dog to a park or off-leash area where you know you’ll find other dogs.

    These encounters will give her the social interactions she needs and loves as a descendant of pack animals. Allow her to go free inside the enclosure so that she’s free to choose her interactions.

    Swimming is an excellent form of regular exercise for your dog that’s not hard on the joints and bones.

    It will help tone her muscles, give her strength, and improve her cardiovascular fitness. Always supervise her when she’s in the water. Even the strongest swimmer can encounter trouble and be unable to swim to shore.

    Perhaps consider a canine life jacket if they are a real water lover.

    One of these will allow her to stay in the water longer before she tires, and it may save her from drowning if she develops problems in the water.

    If you have a very active dog (for example, a Border Collie), you might want to set up some agility training equipment in your yard, and put them through their paces.

    This can include hoops to jump through, tubes to run through, flags to weave in and out of, and ladders to climb. The two of you might even enjoy it enough to enter some competitions!

    Regular exercise for your dog will keep your dog healthy

    During Emergencies

    You’ll need to act quickly and correctly if your dog, or any other dog, is seriously ill, injured or poisoned. Learn what dog first aid to provide in various situations to relieve her suffering and keep her alive until the veterinarian can take over.

    Serious injuries mean handling your dog carefully and transporting her to the veterinary clinic. You’ll have to lift her in a way that limits any further damage, and minimizes her pain.

    What You’ll Find Here

    Dog First Aid 101 is your source for information on all these aspects of canine care. Throughout the site, you’ll find links to valuable resources, along with recommendations for products to help you keep your dog healthy and safe. We’re here to help you help your dog, so that she’ll continue to live a long, happy life.

    May You Never Need It

    I hope you never have to use any of the emergency and first aid information and resources you’ll find in Dog First Aid 101. And I hope you’ll use all of the prevention and preparation information, so that your dog can continue to live a happy, healthy life with you.

    Don’t Put It Off

    Planning and preparing for your dog’s emergency are like writing your will — they’re not something many of us want to do, or even consider. But just like a will, you do need to have them, for your dog’s sake. You’ll feel better knowing that you can keep your dog alive and reduce her suffering during any emergency situation.

    Rottweiler Breed Selector Tool by TrainPetDog

    Welcome to the Rottweiler Web Site

    Welcome to the Advice – Use A Dog Car Restraint System

    Using A Dog Car Restraint System

    If you stop your car quickly, an unrestrained dog can become a flying projectile. A dog car Restraint system will protect them, and everybody else in the car.
    If you don’t travel without strapping yourself in with a seat belt, give your dog that same chance for protection.

    Accident reports reveal that dogs have been thrown through windshields at high speeds when the vehicle rear ended another one, or struck a tree or pole.
    Other dogs have seriously injured the people riding in the car as they bounced and tumbled around the interior.

    There are so many dogs that die or are injured after being thrown from the vehicle that many places now make it illegal to drive with an unrestrained dog within the vehicle.

    Here is another good reason to use a dog car restraint system.

    Your dog, probably dazed, possibly injured, can’t wander away from the scene of the accident. They will receive treatment much sooner if you or others don’t have to go looking for them. An anchored dog may even help prevent an accident. Driving requires a lot of focused attention. Anything that distracts the driver has the potential to cause an accident.
    Unrestrained dogs rank up there, in terms of distractions, with fiddling with the radio or CD player, misbehaving children, eating and drinking, and cell phone use.

    If you have a car or boot with airbags, please, do not let your dog ride in the front seat. They run the same risk of being injured by the air bag as does any child.
    Even if you don’t have airbags, consider always keeping them in the back seat. Because they sit with their head forward (away from the seat), they run a very high risk of striking their head on the dashboard or the windshield.

    Even if you’re using a dog car restraint system.

    Keep them safe.

    Keep them in the back.

    The safest place is the middle of the back seat. If they like to have some air, place them on the passenger side of the car, so that you can see them, and they can see you.

    Please, keep your dog secure while your car is moving. Even a short trip can produce an unexpected, and unimaginable, result.

    How They Work

    Dog car restraint systems are designed to anchor your dog to a place in the car, without limiting her ability to move, stretch, lie down, and stick her nose out the window for some air.

    The system has two parts: the harness and the anchor.

    The harness fits over her chest and upper back. The top goes over their head so it sits on her back, near where it meets the neck.
    The ends wrap around both sides of the chest and meet at their chest, where they meet and fasten to a strap (or two) that runs down the front of their chest, between their front legs.

    The anchor is a set of rings or a strap that connects the harness to the seat belt or to a load tie-down ring in the back of your vehicle.

    The two most popular restraint systems, and the best in terms of the following criteria, are the Ruff Rider Roadie™ and the Champion Canine Designs CHAMPION Canine Seat Belt System™

    What To Look For

    There are several criteria to take into account when shopping for a dog car restraint system.

    Strong

    All buckles and other connectors must be made of metal. Plastic will not take the strain of hundreds of pounds of force (a 30 pound dog can become the equivalent of a 600 pound object at higher speeds).

    Comfortable

    If the harness isn’t comfortable, your dog won’t want to use it.

    If it chafes her skin, any long journey will be uncomfortable, and may cause skin wounds. You can usually buy an optional comfort cover that fits over the nylon web straps of the harness.

    Range of Sizes

    One size does not fit all when it comes to a dog car restraint harness. For proper protection, it should fit tightly but comfortably around your dog’s chest.

    Too loose and it may slip over their head, too tight and it will chafe them, causing irritation.

    Buy the one that is closest to their chest circumference. Measure near the base of the neck, just behind the front legs.

    If you have a puppy, do not buy one for her to "grow into."

    Check if the manufacturer has a puppy program, where they will accept one your dog has grown out of and give you a discount on a larger one.

    Your puppy’s life is at stake here.

    Adjustable

    Every dog is different, so a harness needs to be adjustable to fit those minor differences. Once you have the correct size, you need to be able to adjust the harness so that it fits your dog perfectly.

    Buckles and strap shortener’s should be easy to find and easy to use.
    Can you adjust your dog’s range of motion?
    Can you restrict them to lying down only, or allow them to sit or stand while restrained?

    Easy to Use

    The harness and anchor shouldn’t be difficult to use, or you probably won’t use them, therefore putting your dog at risk.

    Versatile

    Can you use the harness for other uses?
    Is there a short walking leash attached to the harness, or a D ring where you can attach one?
    In other words, can you leave the harness on your dog while you’re both out of the car and use it for other purposes?

    Your dog can’t protect themselves if you’re ever involved in a collision. It’s your job, and your responsibility, to keep them safe. A quality dog car restraint system will allow you to do that.

    Please, don’t leave home without it, and don’t take the car out until they are securely restrained.

    Welcome to the Rottweiler Web Site

    Welcome to the Advice – Dogs Life Jacket

    Rottweiler Dogs Life Preserver.

    You may be wondering why you need a Dog Life Jacket when your dog can swim.

    A dog flotation device (another name for a dog life jacket) will keep them safe from drowning when they has no control over the situation.

    Just about any dog can, and will, swim when it’s their choice to do so.

    Running into the surf after a stick or ball, following you while you’re swimming, or simply going for a cooling dip on a hot summer day, she enters the water how and when she chooses.

    But what if there’s an accident?

    She slips, hits their head on the boat or dock, and falls into the water. If they unconscious, they may drown almost immediately. If they are conscious, they may be dazed or panicked. They will struggle to orient themselves, but they may swim away from shore, eventually exhausting themselves out.

    If they fractures a leg as they fall into the water, they may be unable to swim. The only thing that will keep them alive for more than a minute or two in that situation is a dog life jacket.

    If they loves to swim, a float coat could extend the time they can safely spend in the water before tiring.

    How They Work

    A dog life jacket (also known as a dog life vest, canine flotation device, or canine float coat) works much the same way as a life jacket that you or your kids use.

    It wraps around your dog’s back and fastens below the chest and belly. Most now also have a that fastens below the neck.

    Here are some of the criteria you’ll want to note when deciding on a dog life jacket.

    A colour that is easily seen from a distance. Most float coats are bright orange or yellow. Also look for reflective stripes or trim for added visibility, especially in low-light conditions.

    Foam cells extending around the chest. These add extra buoyancy to your dog. Look for the foam instead of straps only or nylon and straps.

    A grab handle on the top of the jacket (parallel to and above your dog’s spine). The handle needs to be securely sown. The handle and its stitching need enough strength to withstand pulling a wet dog out of the water by the handle.

    Don’t try to pull a very heavy dog (80-100 pounds or more) into a boat by leaning over and grabbing the handle.

    You may injure your back, or end up in the drink yourself. Use the handle to guide your dog to the back of the boat, which is usually lower in the water, or hang on to them while you return to shore.

    A wide variety of sizes. The dog life jacket won’t work well if it’s too loose on your dog. If it’s too tight, they will be bothered by it.

    Design considerations. If you have a male dog, ensure that the jacket you are considering does not restrict or irritate his genitals. He won’t be able to urinate if he’s covered up.

    Quick-release buckles and adjustable straps.

    A leash ring, so you can attach their leash to the life jacket.

    Which Size Will Fit Your Dog?

    The greater the range of sizes, the better the dog life jacket will fit on your dog. The sizes are based on two measurements: girth and length.

    Measure her girth at the widest point of her rib cage, which typically is a bit behind the front legs.
    Measure her length (for this purpose) from the base of her neck to the base of her tail, along her spine.

    See the image below for measurement instructions.

    Dog Life Jacket Measuring Instructions

    Be sure to check the size recommendations as each company’s size range varies. An XXS (extra extra small) from one company may not be for the same size dog as an XXS from another company.

    A life jacket will help keep your pet alive during a boating accident.
    It will also extend the time they enjoy playing and swimming in the water.

    If your family loves the water, keep your dog safer with a canine float coat.

    Welcome to the Rottweiler Web Site

    Welcome to the Advice – Dogs Reflective Vest

    Product Images

    If you take your dog out in dark or secuded places like woodland, you need a dog safety vest to make them highly visible to you and to other hunters. This vest could prevent a tragic accident.

    Out in the seclution, miles from the nearest town, if your dog has an accident, it will likely be fatal. Even a wound that is not immediately life-threatening could cause death if they go into shock.

    Prevent it all from happening by making them as visible as possible with a reflective vest.

    If you like to take late night walks with your dog, they could become another traffic fatality if you don’t make them visible to traffic, including cyclists.
    A bicycle dog collision in a park or field, or on a road or woodland trail, could easily cause serious trauma.

    A reflective vest will help prevent this tragedy by giving a rider enough time time to brake or take evasive action.
    Although car dog collisions are likely to be restricted to roadways, they are much more likely to lead to death or maiming. Stopping a car takes much more time and distance than does stopping a bicycle.

    Give your dog a chance by keeping him decked out in a dog safety vest.

    How To Choose A Good Vest

    A dog safety vest should be as bright as possible. A bright or fluorescent orange color is the best for high visibility.

    Look for a vest with a lot of reflective stripes, webbing or trim.
    The more reflective material on the vest, the safer your dog will be at night.
    This reflective material should provide 360° visibility.

    Look for a vest that covers all of his back and rib cage area. The more his chest is covered, the better.
    If the vest does not travel down to the tail, ensure that it at least covers all the rib cage and upper back.

    There is at least one vest designed to protect the chest between the legs, as well as the underarms, from abrasions due to bushes and thorns. Unfortunately, it does not cover much of the lower back or abdomen.

    Most vests are available in a range of sizes.

    Use one that fits your dog snugly. Loose material could become snagged in underbrush, or a branch could slide between his skin and the vest, and possibly scratch or wound him.

    See the graphic below for help measuring your dog.

    Dog Safety Vest Measurement Instructions

    If you’re using the vest to protect him while hunting, keep it with your hunting gear so that you always have it with you when you get to the camp.

    And consider purchasing an extra dog safety vest to keep in your car or truck for those unplanned stops after the sun goes down.

    Anything that improves your dog’s visibility improves his chance of avoiding injury by shooting or collision.

    Give them the chance they deserves with a dog safety vest.

    During Emergencies

    You’ll need to act quickly and correctly if your dog, or any other dog, is seriously ill, injured or poisoned. Learn what dog first aid to provide in various situations to relieve her suffering and keep her alive until the veterinarian can take over.

    Serious injuries mean handling your dog carefully and transporting her to the veterinary clinic. You’ll have to lift her in a way that limits any further damage, and minimizes her pain.

    What You’ll Find Here

    Dog First Aid 101 is your source for information on all these aspects of canine care. Throughout the site, you’ll find links to valuable resources, along with recommendations for products to help you keep your dog healthy and safe. We’re here to help you help your dog, so that she’ll continue to live a long, happy life.

    May You Never Need It

    I hope you never have to use any of the emergency and first aid information and resources you’ll find in Dog First Aid 101. And I hope you’ll use all of the prevention and preparation information, so that your dog can continue to live a happy, healthy life with you.

    Don’t Put It Off

    Planning and preparing for your dog’s emergency are like writing your will — they’re not something many of us want to do, or even consider. But just like a will, you do need to have them, for your dog’s sake. You’ll feel better knowing that you can keep your dog alive and reduce her suffering during any emergency situation.

    Welcome to the Rottweiler Web Site

    Welcome to the Advice –In Control In Unusual Situations With Dogs –

    Pic 3

    This section looks at how proof training can help eliminate the dangers even the most obedient dog can face when in a provocative situation.

    This training will ensure that he deals with the situation the way you expect them to.

    Proof Training

    Most serious trainers are familiar with the concept of proof training — conditioning a dog to perform in less-than-ideal circumstances. It’s a type of mental stress test, asking for concentration in difficult surroundings.

    Proof training provokes disobedience in a controlled environment so that the dog may be corrected, and therefore learn. Conditioning the dog to ignore distractions helps to prevent disobedience in similar unplanned situations. The dog learns to obey no matter what is going on around it.

    Use your imagination to create unusual tests, because the unusual will happen.

    Run through the training area shouting and clapping your hands.
    Turn out the lights and work in the dark.
    Bounce a ball.
    Toss shoes and soda cans across the floor.
    Wear funny hats and costumes.

    In basic, any action or costume that may not be the normal for you or the situation the dog may find themselves in.

    It’s a refreshing break of routine for everyone, and dogs that can obey in these situations are steady dogs. They assume every distraction is just another trick and they’re not going to fall for it!

    While a failure in training is not a life-or-death trauma, a failure in obedience outside the training could very well be fatal. A dog that will not reliably come when called, heel off lead and stay, runs a terrible risk of injury or death.

    As responsible dog owners, we have two choices; never take our dogs from the security of our own homes, or effectively train them to function daily in the outside world.

    "Real Life" Obedience

    Classroom training can give you a head start, but proof training has to be done in the "real world." You must train your dog to be trustworthy outside the artificial conditions of the ring or class.

    Your first step is to know your own dog. Know their weaknesses as a dog, as a member of their breed, and as a unique individual. Perhaps their "Achilles heel" is horses, cats, cars, bicycles, garbage cans, meter readers, or all of the above! Learn the temptations he can’t resist, and drill on these unmercifully.

    Some breeds have problems overcoming natural impulses [in order] to give you their full attention. Sporting breeds, for example, have been bred to find, flush and retrieve birds, and are easily distracted when birds are present.

    The object of proof training is not to smother this in-bred trait, but to remind the dog that you are in control, and you are the one who decides what activity will be pursued.

    A case in point is an OTCh. Pointer who was distracted during a competition by a pigeon flying across the ring. The dog froze to mark the pigeon’s progress, and waited until it was gone to complete their exercise. Although they resisted the urge to chase the bird, they couldn’t totally ignore it.

    Proof training had not destroyed their natural instincts, for this dog also performed well in field work. they had simply been trained to respond first to commands, rather than to their own instincts.

    Proof-trained Beagles will still run rabbits, and Border Collies will still herd livestock. Dobermans will still bark at intruders, and Brittanys will still chase birds. But, with the proper conditioning, they will relinquish these activities when you find them unacceptable or dangerous. That’s the purpose of proof training.

    To begin your real-life training, select an exercise you are sure your dog knows perfectly (for example, sit-stay). Now devise a temptation you think will persuade him to disobey.

    Don’t make this test too easy; you really want them to flunk a few times so you can show them what you want. Try to anticipate Their reaction so you can be ready with an appropriate correction.

    For example, as a sit-stay distraction, place a cat in front of your sitting dog. Tell the dog to stay, take a firm grip on the lead, and have a helper shoo the cat away. If the dog tries to chase, correct them, and repeat the command to stay. Repeat the exercise until they do not try to pursue the cat.

    If they do not lunge at the cat, they have passed the first test. Praise them for obeying, and make the test more difficult. Remove the lead. Increase your distance from the dog. Chase the cat away yourself by shouting and clapping your hands. Step out of sight, leaving the dog and cat alone together. (Note that this requires a very patient cat!) Use different temptations, especially those that appeal to your dog.

    Start cautiously, and work up slowly on each temptation, achieving reliability at each level of difficulty. Don’t attempt too much too quickly, or you may be disappointed at your lack of success.

    Proof training is like physical exercise; a gradual conditioning builds strength. You’ll have a real sense of accomplishment when you return from an out-of-sight stay to find your dog sitting staunchly, while the cat preens tantalizingly within reach!

    Avoid the

    "training collar syndrome," when the dog believes they won’t be corrected if they are not wearing his chain collar. Dogs do associate different activities with their different collars, and they tend to be exclusive in their association. "When I’m wearing my hunting collar, I don’t have to come all the way in when called. When I’m wearing my show collar, no one dares correct me." Practice obedience with every collar.

    Certainly most disobedience occurs off-lead and out-of-collar, so this is where you should concentrate your work. Remove a dog’s collar, and they will wriggle and shake themselves. "Free at last," their body language is saying!

    Your dog must believe that obedience is required at all times, even when you can’t physically control them. Go back through your successful proof-trained exercises without the benefit of collar and lead, just to be certain this is reliable.Train your dog in places where they often disobey. If your city dog becomes "deaf and blind" on your country outings, take time to train in those surroundings. If, for example, he chases livestock, hold a training session in the pasture or barnyard.

    Work until they understands they must pay attention and obey you in that very spot. Now release them, and let them begin his pursuit.

    Can you call him away? Congratulations!


    Does he ignore you?

    Time for more proof training.

    Incorporating proof training into everyday living requires the same pattern of correction and praise as competition training. When your dog gives in to temptation, they won’t learn to resist unless they is corrected immediately.

    Don’t hesitate to correct them because you’re embarrassed to "make a scene" in public. Don’t hesitate to praise them in the high, silly "Good boy!" voice they love, just because someone might hear you. Remember, you’re doing this for your dog.

    One important element remains. Dogs will be dogs, not obedient robots, and we wouldn’t want them to be otherwise. Some obedience problems can’t be conquered with proof training. There may be some temptations your dog can never be trusted to resist, and it’s your responsibility to know those, and protect him from them.

    Objectively evaluate your dog’s reliability. Don’t be blinded to potential dangers by ego, laziness, or overconfidence.

    There is no end to proof training; it goes on every day of your dog’s life. New situations constantly arise that you will need to teach them about. It isn’t easy, but the rewards are many, and the alternatives deadly.

    Put forth the extra effort to proof train your dog for practical obedience, and you’ll enjoy a true companion who can share your life safely and sanely. The obedience degrees you earn can represent genuine achievement; don’t settle for an empty title.